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Saturday, October 18, 2014

Jury awards Plaintiff $12 million in Toyota lap belt case

“The whole courtroom was in tears, and so was the jury. The evidence was strong; it was an absolute slam dunk.” - Chelsie Hill's father, quoted by KSBW.com news.
Who woulda thought? Coverup King and now-admitted-crook Toyota is having problems convincing juries that it's telling the truth. No wonder Toyota prefers out-of-court, confidential settlements. Even more so since it lost that landmark unintended acceleration case in Oklahoma last October.
It's a real shame that consumers have to file expensive, time consuming, and emotionally draining lawsuits to stand a chance of prevailing against crooked corporations like Toyota. Equally bad that we have a corporate-controlled government kissin' up to these crooks by manufacturing bald-faced lies - no, NASA did NOT rule out electronic defects as a cause of unintended acceleration - and simply "refusing to comment" if anyone dares to confront the auto industry's repulsive little puppets with a few facts. 
In Hill's case - involving a 4Runner - admitted-crook Toyota is "expected to appeal." Is anyone surprised?

Update 10/18/14 - Another article puts the situation in proper perspective. Hill's lawyer says "Toyota misled the public about the safety of their lap belts and now there are millions of people out there driving those cars," and Ben Kelley, a Center for Auto Safety board member who testified at the trial, points out that "As of 2014, there are more than 3 million Toyota vehicles with at least one lap belt - similar to the one Hill wore - driving in the U.S."

Update 10/19/2014 - VIDEO: former Assistant Secretary of the Treasury Dr. Paul Craig Roberts offers some GREAT comments on the revolving door twixt this corrupt government's so-called regulators and the industries they puppet for, paving the way for lucrative jobs in those industries. NHTSA (No Help To Solve Anything) and Toyota are prime examples, which probably explains how Toyota's lap belts squeaked by "safety regulators" in the first place. Kudos to Dr. Roberts for pointing out that Americans no longer care if someone has the reputation of being a crook.